Change your thoughts and you'll change your world.

 

Chris Pratt interrupts the interview to french braid intern’s hair x

chris pratt’s standings in my book continue to skyrocket.. I can’t even french braid that well 

(Source: pinefarts)

i want a word for the almost-home.

that point where the highway’s monotony becomes familiar
that subway stop whose name will always wake you from day’s-end dozing
that first glimpse of the skyline
that you never loved until you left it behind.

what do you call the exit sign you see even in your dreams?
is there a name for the airport terminal you come back to,
comfortably exhausted?

i need a word for rounding your corner onto your street,
for seeing your city on the horizon,
for flying homewards down your highway.

give me a word for the boundary
between the world you went to see
and the small one you call your own.

i want a word for the moment you know
you’re almost home.

there and back again, n.m.h. (via anoraborealis)

flyartproductions:

The persistence of Ms. Jackson
The Persistence of Memory (1931), Salvador Dali / Ms. Jackson, Outkast

flyartproductions:

The persistence of Ms. Jackson

The Persistence of Memory (1931), Salvador Dali / Ms. Jackson, Outkast

thedarklordkeisha:

Calvin is the most relatable protagonist in the history of anything.

Social media in a nutshell. 

(Source: idkcake)

We are more than the worst thing that’s ever happened to us. All of us need to stop apologizing for having been to hell and come back breathing.

Clementine von Radics (via modernhepburn)

(Source: anomalyatlarge)

My family is from Nigeria, and my full name is Uzoamaka, which means “The road is good.” Quick lesson: My tribe is Igbo, and you name your kid something that tells your history and hopefully predicts your future. So anyway, in grade school, because my last name started with an A, I was the first in roll call, and nobody ever knew how to pronounce it. So I went home and asked my mother if I could be called Zoe. I remember she was cooking, and in her Nigerian accent she said, “Why?” I said, “Nobody can pronounce it.” Without missing a beat, she said, “If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka.”

(Source: adamakara)